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October 2023

This month we have: outine head to pelvis CT post arrest, an RCEM ASC Interview Megamix and New Online,
Reflections on revising for the FRCEM examinations
Delirium, or acute confusional state, is a common cause of attendance to an ED. The high morbidity and mortality associated with this condition highlights the need for continuing review of the management of acutely-confused elderly patients.
Delirium, or acute confusional state, is a common cause of attendance to an ED. The high morbidity and mortality associated with this condition highlights the need for continuing review of the management of acutely-confused elderly patients. 
We’ve talked a lot in RCEMLearning blogs about how to recognise death in ED and how to break bad news, but we haven’t really focused on how to legally “declare” someone as dead, and complete the relevant paperwork. It is through researching updates to my trust’s policy, together with making sure our international medical graduates were aware of the UK rules, that this blog post was born.
This learning session explores how to recognise patient trajectories as they approach the end of their lives, as well as the diagnosis of dying.
A patient with acute behavioural disturbance is proving very hard to manage, you need to gain control but by what means and what powers do you have to achieve this?
In this article I use the word "vulnerable" to imply an individual at risk for an enhanced need of special care, support, or protection because of age, disability, or risk of abuse or neglect.
A 13-year-old female collapses whilst running. How will you assess and manage this?
The patient is now on ITU, having had a 2 hour delay because of errors.
A young man is brought to your ED by police. They suspect he has concealed drugs internally and want you to perform an intimate search and x-ray.
This session is an overview of Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy and Childhood (SUDIC); the risk factors associated with SUDIC, our role in the ED and the investigative process thereafter.