Just another ‘renal colic’

A 36-year-old gentleman presents with intermittent flank pain and has microscopic haematuria. His BP is 220/110 and he is now pain free. What would you do next?…

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Phaeochromocytoma

The spontaneous presentation of phaeochromocytoma is normally between the age of 40 and 50 years, however the hereditary forms often present in younger individuals, including children.…

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Pulmonary Hypertension

Patients with known pulmonary hypertension may present to the emergency department with a variety of acute problems related to this disease such as pulmonary embolism…

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Pulmonary Hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an elevation in pulmonary vascular pressure that can be caused by an isolated increase in pulmonary arterial pressure.…

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Hypertensive Emergencies

A hypertensive emergency is defined as the clinical situation in which there is a marked elevation of blood pressure (BP) associated with acute or progressive end organ damage, e.g. cardiovascular, re…

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