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Name that Broken Bone

This 18-year-old patient was allegedly punched by a stranger during a night out.
This session describes the different types of dental infection and the pathophysiology of their development.
This module describes the different types of dental infection and the pathophysiology of their development.
This session covers the assessment, treatment and management of patients presenting to the ED with primary blast injuries.
This module covers the assessment, treatment and management of patients presenting to the ED with primary blast injuries.
A 32-year-old gentleman presents to the ED following a cricket ball impact to his left eye.
A 70-year-old gentleman presents to the ED with pain in left lower jaw, worsening over the last 3 days.
A woman presents with 10/10 eye pain. Consider what could be going on, rule out the red flags and address her urgent concerns!
A 45-year-old female attends with grossly swollen lips. She has some important information about her symptoms, can you understand it? моє обличчя опухло! If not, it’s time to use some clinical acumen!
It is Saturday night and your next patient is a 28-year-old man who has been assaulted earlier that evening.
A 23-year-old male presents to the ED on a Friday night with a punch injury to the face.
A 14-year-old girl presented at the ED after falling into a tree and impaling her cheek with a large twig, just below her right eye, obscuring her vision.
You are on the ED observation unit morning ward round. Your next patient is a 25-year-old man, admitted during the night for “head injury observations” following an alleged assault.
A 30-year-old professional martial artist sustained a direct blow to the left side of his face during training.
A 9-year-old girl presents to the Emergency Department with a persistent egg shaped swelling on her forehead following a seemingly minor head injury two weeks ago
Identify the anatomical factors that contribute to the pathophysiology of mandibular and temporomandibular joint injury
Fractures of the mandible are the second most common facial fracture seen in the ED after nasal fracture
Anyone who has ever worked in an ED on a Friday night knows that facial injuries are a common presentation
This session covers the assessment, investigation and management of injuries to the bones of the midface; the zygoma, zygomatic arch, maxilla, orbit and nose.
Patients frequently attend the emergency department (ED) with episodes of cutaneous and mucosal swelling.
Cranial nerve injuries are important clinical signs, which alert the examiner to intracranial pathology. This session will look at the more common traumatic and medical causes of cranial nerve injury
Ear trauma is a common presentation to the Emergency Department. Whilst generally simple to manage, the consequences of ear trauma have the potential to impact patients’ day-to-day lives significantly
An injury to the tooth-supporting structures with no increase in tooth mobility, and no displacement of the tooth. The tooth however is tender to touch
This session aims to give a brief overview of dental emergencies that may present in A&E, including aetiology, diagnosis and management
This month we have New in EM Blood cultures, Dental Emergencies, RCEM FIB Guidelines
An 18-year old man makes a mistake with a beer bottle.
Another night out and another facial injury.
This aims to provide the learner with an overview of common types of skin and soft tissue injuries, how best to accurately describe these, and considers the mechanism most likely to be responsible.
This teaching session aims to provide the learner with an overview of common types of skin and soft tissue injuries, how best to accurately describe these, and considers the mechanism most likely to be responsible.
FRCEM Primary Examination Single Best Answer
This month we have Dental Anaesthesia in the Emergency Department, and sources of bias in studies of diagnostic test performance
Managing Parkinson’s in the ED, Flaoting in the Face of Danger, MaxFax injuries in the E, and Paediatric Heart Murmurs & what to do with them
You put an adult trauma call out and start preparing for the patient.
The 3rd in the series on Eye Anatomy. This vodcast looks at the bits that move the eye. Make sure you check out the other 2 vodcasts, bits of the eye and bony parts of the eye as well. Enjoy!