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Is it a clot?

A 65-year-old female presents to the ED with a painful swollen left leg. How confident are you in risk assessment and management of DVT?
This session covers the management of patients who present to the emergency department with macro or microscopic haematuria.
This module covers the management of patients who present to the emergency department with macro or microscopic haematuria.
A set of 10 Multiple choice questions to help you revise. The Questions have been selected at random covering the curriculum.
A set of 10 Multiple choice questions to help you revise. The Questions have been selected at random covering the curriculum.
A young lady presented with abdominal pain, lethargy, (Groin) bone pain, depression and headache.
A man with weight loss, abdominal pain and fevers attends your ED. He has HIV and is on antiretroviral therapy.
A 68-year-old man attends the ED one evening with a painful right knee.
Patients present to ED with complications of etiologies that might not yet have been diagnosed. As ED physicians, it’s imperative to connect the dots and identify themes, beyond the acute complaints.
This SBA will test your knowledge on worrying presentations to ED, and when fevers come and go.
A 50-year-old female presents to the Emergency Department with non-traumatic neuropathic sounding upper limb pain.
A young boy with abdominal pain and distension is brought in by his father. The triage nurse mentions that he is hypertensive, with microscopic haematuria on his urine dipstick.
The ED often plays a vital role in making the first diagnosis of cancer.
Life threatening complications of cancer – more than neutropenia.
The spontaneous presentation of phaeochromocytoma is normally between the age of 40 and 50 years, however the hereditary forms often present in younger individuals, including children.
Describing the key features relevant to the history of phaeochromocytoma
Here are two cases of oncological and palliative care emergencies that might present to the emergency department, that we should know how to treat.
Hypercalcaemia is commonly seen in patients with malignant disease. This session explains the assessment and management of the problem in the emergency department
Hypercalcaemia is commonly seen in patients with malignant disease. This session explains the assessment and management of the problem in the emergency department
Patients frequently attend the emergency department (ED) with episodes of cutaneous and mucosal swelling.
A 67-year-old man presents via ambulance with shortness of breath and fever. He has recently completed his first 2 week chemotherapy course for auricular Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), administered via a PICC line.
An 86-year-old lady was admitted to the Emergency Department following a vacant episode during the night.