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NAI or not

A 5-year-old boy presents with a central boggy swelling to his forehead without history of trauma, what’s the differential?
This is the second blog in our public health series. Keep your eyes peeled for more public health goodness to follow in future blogs.
This module explores the presentations of children to the ED by concerned parents after a potential ingestion of a substance is common.
This module explores the presentations of children to the ED by concerned parents after a potential ingestion of a substance is common.
With a huge burden of mental and physical health needs carried by patients with eating disorders, ED clinicians need to be aware of how they can give the care needed.
This month we discuss: Using lactate to diagnose seizures, Non-fatal strangulation, Impact of familiarity on performance and New Online.
An 8-month infant is brought into the ED following a collapsing episode as witnessed by his distress mother. What do you do next?
A 13-year-old female collapses whilst running. How will you assess and manage this?
A 45-year-old female attended the ED after taking an intentional antifreeze overdose.
The unspoken disease of inflicted, non-accidental injury in children.
Where does PEM fit in with EM? Children make up about 25-30% of attendances to mixed EDs nationally, so all EM consultants must possess at least basic paediatric skills.
A set of 10 Multiple choice questions to help you revise. The Questions have been selected at random covering the curriculum.
A set of 10 Multiple choice questions to help you revise. The Questions have been selected at random covering the curriculum.
A set of 10 Multiple choice questions to help you revise. The Questions have been selected at random covering the curriculum.
A set of 10 Multiple choice questions to help you revise. The Questions have been selected at random covering the curriculum.
A previously fit and well, fully immunised 10-month-old is brought into your ED with a 3 hour history of drowsiness.
Could this be a BRUE? A Brief, Resolved, Unexplained Event
This session outlines a standardised approach to providing care for a haemodynamically normal patient presenting following rape or sexual assault.
This session outlines a standardised approach to providing care for a haemodynamically normal patient presenting following rape or sexual assault.
An uncircumcised young man has sought emergency medical attention with penile pain & bleeding after coitus.
The dark side of PEM, and what should also be on your differential diagnosis for any patient you are seeing is: "was this inflicted" and "is there something more?"
It's safe to say you will likely see a few of these, as minor injuries are a very common occurrence in childhood with around 20-30% of all paediatric attendances to the Emergency Department involving minor injuries or trauma
How will you manage the absconding patient?
Paediatric injuries can be very different from those sustained in adults in many respects. This session discusses why this is the case and outlines the general principles of treating paediatric injuries.
Paediatric injuries can be very different from those sustained in adults in many respects. This session discusses why this is the case and outlines the general principles of treating paediatric injuries.
How will you manage your absconding patient with suicidal intent who has gone ‘absent without leave’?
How will you manage the absconding patient?
Learn more about the Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARACS) and their role managing in domestic abuse.
12% of ED attendances are related to domestic abuse. How will you identify & manage these cases?
Communicating with little people?
12% of ED attendances are related to domestic abuse. ED physicians are in a unique position to identify these cases.
Buckle / Torus fractures in children
In this blog we will talk about how to overcome barriers, which will help you build trust with and get the information you need from the patient to treat them and keep them safe, with some great insights from young people working with Redthread.
A 16-year-old is brought in by ambulance to your resuscitation room with a reduced level of consciousness and then starts to see monkeys everywhere. What’s going on?
FII is a broad term to describe a group of behaviours by parents or carers which cause harm to children.
This blog presents a whistle stop tour of adolescent medicine as it applies to the ED and discusses some hints and tips on how to improve the ED experience for adolescents whilst also increasing your confidence in supporting the needs of this sometimes tricky age group.
With potential to wreak systemic havoc for years following initial infection, Group A beta-haemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes (or, far more conveniently, ‘GAS’) are organisms truly worthy of our inner nerd.
Radiology interpretation
The child with decreased consciousness is a common problem with many possible diagnoses and potentially high mortality and morbidity.
The child with decreased consciousness is a common problem with many possible diagnoses and potentially high mortality and morbidity
This month Andrew and Graham discuss frequent attenders
Each year at the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM) Annual Scientific Conference, the prestigious Elizabeth Molyneux Prize is awarded. The prize, named in honour of Professor Elizabeth Molyneux, recognises outstanding work in the field of Paediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM).
Why is this a hot topic? It is a sign of serious distress. It is common. It is strongly associated with suicide. Suicide is one of commonest causes death in young people. 200% increase in self harm 1985-1995. If ever you have the opportunity to save a young persons life - it is now.
It's Friday evening and you're at work in the ED (where else would you rather be??). Jack is a 15 year old boy who has taken an overdose of paracetamol a couple of hours ago. He texted his girlfriend soon after and she called an ambulance
The October 2018 podcast
The dark side of PEM, and what should also be on your differential diagnosis for any patient you are seeing is: "was this inflicted" and "is there something more?".
It's safe to say you will likely see a few of these, as minor injuries are a very common occurrence in childhood with around 20-30% of all paediatric attendances to the Emergency Department involving minor injuries or trauma.
Headaches are one of the most common presentations to ED and may be primary or secondary. Migraine is the most common type of primary headache, but the majority of headaches are benign in nature and require no investigations
Fractures are the second most common manifestation of abuse in children after burns. In toddlers especially, fractures of the humerus and femur, should trigger alarm bells about non-accidental injury (NAI)
With the advent of urgent care centres, your exposure to orthopaedics won’t be what it used to be. However, if you follow some of the basic tips here, your orthopaedic surgeons and patients will be happy!
RCEM '15 in Manchester has been a sell out! So for those of you that weren't lucky enough to be here, here's what's been going on on Day 2!
So RCEM '15 in Manchester has been a sell out! So for those of you that weren't lucky enough to be here, here's what's been going on on Day 1!
The ED plays a crucial role in raising the alarm for non-accidental injuries. Frequently, we may be the first port-of call for a child who has gone through the unthinkable, and it is our role to think about the possibility in this vulnerable group
This podcast covers the Best Practice Guideline on Information Sharing to Prevent Community Violence, which can be found along with all the other guidelines on the main RCEM site.